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What are we supposed to believe?

That Strapps was mistaken? That although appearing to witnesses be too drunk to notice the mosquitoes, the man he was watching got up, unseen, climbed up to the road and found a place that sold him a pasty, ate it about 10 pm according to the autopsy, then came back to the same spot, again unseen, climbed down the steps, lit up a cigarette, lay down and died?

or

That Strapps wasn’t mistaken and the man he had been watching got up, unseen, went somewhere to be sick and to change his soiled clothing before eating a pasty and coming back, again unseen, where he lit up a cigarette and died?

And with both propositions being equally ludicrous, what else is there we can believe in?

If ….

If DS Leane had taken possession of the Tamam Sud slip from Cleland in April he would have had the newspapers aboard straight away. Which may have alerted Chemist Freeman much sooner, which would have meant the Rubaiyat be submitted as evidence before the inquest, which would have required Harkness to provide a deposition.

Which would have changed the outcome.

~~

What are we supposed to believe?

That Leane forgot all about the slip as it nestled in the fob pocket of the trousers locked away in the evidence room downstairs for seven weeks?

That he didn’t think it was worth pursuing until the inquest date approached?

 

 

4. ‘Answer me this, Detective Sergeant Leane,’ thundered the coroner, ‘why did you sit on a crucial piece of evidence for seven weeks?’

... and the court gasped.

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3. If we were to take the Lawson Proposition seriously ….

Where would you look for confirmation?

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2. Paul Lawson’s disturbing near-admission

Did he nearly give the game away?

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1. Paul Lawson’s tender ground.

Littlemore knew

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What does it take to get dude47 and Dome together?

The link

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Another look at the code

Child’s play ..

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dude47 – an ongoing series, updated

The thick plottens ..

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The Code, the Cipher Foundation and Marcel Varallo

A pity he wasn't trying to memorise how a couple of the Rubaiyat quatrains went, looks like he had the book on his lap.

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Vigo’s Man. Another stolen car scenario.

Who do you trust with the cash?

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I can see shapes, but I’m wary ..

Comment from Boris … aka пожалуйста

“I’ve never been able to reliably discern any numbers or letters in the areas indicated on the code page, inscription, etc.

I can see shapes. But they appear to me, using the simple screens I have access to, to be random. Some are more character-like than others. But I’m wary of assuming that they are anything more than printing or imaging artifacts because my attention has been drawn to them by little red boxes and arrows and I know I’m therefore almost automatically “pattern-seeking”. It’s a limitation of the human brain… a kind of vestigial Pleistocene heuristic that’s maybe outlived its usefulness. Certainly in this arena. Given the apparent volume and complex distribution of enciphered micro-writing across e.g. the code page, how was it intended to be coherently (e.g. sequentially) read?

It seems to be an incredibly complex system, involving a cipher (the code) with a steganographic and further enciphered text concealed within it. That’s not to dismiss it: perhaps some secrets are worth that kind of security. But it feels like quite a stretch. Until someone can come up with a comparable example or a coherent set of instructions of how it is to be read (not decrypted… just read).”

“But I’m wary of assuming that they are anything more than printing or imaging artifacts because my attention has been drawn to them by little red boxes and arrows and I know I’m therefore almost automatically “pattern-seeking”. It’s a limitation of the human brain.”

 

Two prominent baccarat players and a nit-keeper.

Their world

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Shiv

A stabbing tool

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Sex

It happened ..

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How to make fake licence plates

A cutting process using sharp tools and tinned zinc

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Gordon Cramer – his theory is certainty.

Despite Derek Abbott's scepticism.

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