Skip to content

another look at roger hollis

Roger Hollis was described as being a Freemason by Edward Hendrie in his book  Bloody Zion.

The book also says the Soviet KGB used Freemasonry to get spies into top British intelligence jobs, and that its biggest success was the naming of the late Sir Roger Hollis as head of MI5 counter-intelligence in 1956.

~~

Many people have heard about the first three masonic degrees or Craft freemasonry which in England is controlled by the United Grand Lodge or Grand Chapter both at Freemasons Hall at Great Queen Street.

However the higher degrees of Masonry, above Master Mason or the third degree, are run by the Supreme Council whose offices are at 10 Duke Street. On, or just off Duke Street are Mason’s Yard, the Chequers pub and the famous Fortnum and Mason’s.

Interestingly 10 Duke Street also is mentioned in Nigel West’s (aka ex MP Rupert Allason) book on MI6. Charles de Gaulle had his HQ there for the “Bureau Central de Reseignments and d’Action” resistance in the Second World War. This was led by Captain Andre Dewarvrin aka Colonel Passy.

Whether 10 Duke Street (aka The Grand East) was used by the French at the instigation of Freemasons, MI6 or MI5 is not clear but there is likely be an overlap between the secretive organisations. Stephen Knight described the higher echelons of freemasonry and the Supreme Council at 10 Duke Street [p39] in his book The Brotherhood [1]. He also mentions several high profile masons, many of these are in the armed forces, and also likely targets to be recruited as officers or agents for MI6.

Lifted from here

https://cathyfox.wordpress.com/2015/12/01/freemasonry-mi6-and-10-duke-street/

10 Duke Street

~~

Roger Hollis helped in the formation of ASIO. He visited Australia twice in 1948, once in the company of Sir Percy Sillitoe, who was thought to have become a Mason while serving in Chesterfield as Chief Constable. Sillitoe went on to head the MI5.

In consequence of the visits individuals were sought to head the new agency by K H Bailey, the Commonwealth Solicitor General.  He asked Justice G S Reed’s advice and in March 1949 Reed, a South Australian,  got the job.

~~

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s