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acrostic v steganography

There are some who insist the characters found on the back cover of the Rubaiyat are an acrostic.

acrostic
əˈkrɒstɪk/Submit
noun
a poem, word puzzle, or other composition in which certain letters in each line form a word or words.

There are others who hold that the characters found on the back cover of the Rubaiyat are examples of steganography.

steganography
stɛɡəˈnɒɡrəfɪ/Submit
noun
the practice of concealing messages or information within other non-secret text or data.

This doesn’t mean the acrostic folk disbelieve in the existence of steganography, they just don’t believe it applies in the Tamam Shud case.

The luxury of such a negative conclusion is that no reasoning is required to support it, other than a personal bias.

~~

As an aside, imagine the frightening concept where both the Tamam Shud code and the Voynich Manuscript are proved to be examples of steganography.

20 Comments Post a comment
  1. Eric Nave vs Gordon Cramer?

    Riiiiiiiight….

    July 6, 2017
    • What? I’m supposed to know what you mean?

      July 6, 2017
      • Captain Eric Nave OBE, Australia’s greatest ever codebreaker, was the person the police sent the Rubaiyat page to: and it was Nave who said that it was an acrostic.
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Nave

        If you want to, you might try reading his biography, “A Man of Intelligence” (2006). It’s a pretty good read, though it doesn’t mention the Somerton Man.

        So, let’s try that again:

        Eric Nave vs Gordon Cramer?

        Riiiiiiiight….

        July 7, 2017
  2. By the way, nickpelling! I googled your site for steganography and couldn’t find it .. George Orwell in reverse? Or am I reading something into it that isn’t there?
    Words … how they trip and trap the unwary writer.
    Your move.

    July 6, 2017
    • petebowes: Googling ciphermysteries.com for the word steganography returns 128 results, so I’m not sure what you’re talking about here.

      July 7, 2017
      • This from the genius who invented the Rubaiyat car theory, one year in the making, two minutes in the dismantling.

        July 7, 2017
        • “Dismantled”? What, like the microwriting that isn’t there in the different scans?

          July 7, 2017
          • Genius!!! It has a ring to it, don’t it?

            July 7, 2017
            • So far, all you’ve managed to do with the Rubaiyat Car Theory is loosely weave stories around your interpretation of it, and then complain about the stories. Feel free to raise your game, it would be a nice change.

              July 7, 2017
  3. ….. and just to keep on the message, do you think it likely or unlikely steganography was used as a means of communication during and after the war?

    By the way .. Perhaps I should have been more specific on the apparent absence of the word steganography on your site. I should have asked how many mentions of the word are there in a Somerton post?
    I’ve looked all the way back to 2008, found none.

    July 7, 2017
    • john sanders #

      The yanks did not take to our Theodore one iota (ask Rudolph), and referred to him as ‘Eric the red’; so did most of his own staff in the decoding section, the ones that were not fellow travellers of course. Whereas our Gordon has always been pretty much the straight shooter, just like his Chinese namesake, the general from Khartoum, that is.

      July 7, 2017
    • Apart from posts disproving the presence of microwriting, Cipher Mysteries contains no mentions of steganography in connection with the Somerton Man, because there is no steganography connected to the Somerton Man.

      July 7, 2017
      • Well, when we have one man who says the opposite and has shown multiple, credible examples of steganography in the code, what do you say there?

        July 7, 2017
        • john sanders #

          Looks like its up to you Gordon. Do you have something we can at least munch on; say a little more on the CA 15 for instance. How about the GAB sign off signature; l’d almost bet on no trace of any writing under the ‘B’ with the terminating flourish. Cheers mate.

          July 7, 2017
  4. I thought about the AB sign-off and finally put it down to the bored constable given the job to smudge out the steganography.
    Here’s a thing, why didn’t the constable cover the straight lines with straight lines?

    July 7, 2017
  5. Might disagree on the AB, I think it’s AR with a flourish away. If you take a closer look and compare it to the B’s used elsewhere on the page I think you’ll see the difference.

    John, I can promise you something substantial and very new in the coming days 🙂

    July 7, 2017
    • john sanders #

      Point taken Gordon and note that you have stated this B v R theory previously. I’m thinking on the possibility of a different hand as the G & A letters appear somewhat dissimilar. Do you still standby your belief that the last line header is a V opposed to I. Obviously in your steganographical view none of this makes a difference, but it leaves our acrosticators having to make adgustments.

      July 8, 2017
  6. John, yes I stand by that, a close up view of the first letter of the last line shows 2 distinct tracks from a single point heading upwards and outwards. I agree that the letters appear different from the rest but hard to know why that should be.Hopefully the latest Post about Jestyn and Alf may clear that up.

    This matches the Morse-code Pro-Sign found in the WW2 Radio Operators manual. The V stands for ‘message from and the AR is for ‘this is my last message, no reply is expected or required’. My further thinking is that each letter on the code page has an equivalent pro-sign and that pro-sign is effectively an instruction in regards to the micro-code contained within that letter. So, the letter T is for Transmit the contents of this letter, and the V is for message from with information on who that message was from contained within and so on for each letter on the code page. Hope that all makes sense 🙂

    July 8, 2017
    • john sanders #

      We might ask ourselves why was Eric Nave’s opinion sought on the code; its acrostic make up would have been apparent and it may not have been within the scope of his particular expertise. Even more importantly who sent it to him and would he have been acting in an official capacity. Note that the police claim that they first saw the ‘code’ in late June ’49 and yet Eric took his leave from both the RN & RAN in March. Might it have been given to him by Errol Canney after they both started their new spy jobs in Canberra with Bob Wake in about October. Could it be that he became aware of its existence earlier, even as early as 20 November 1948, when all the lads met up for the big air show, ten days before SM’s day out at the beach?.

      July 10, 2017
      • john sanders #

        Relative date for the rubaiyat was in fact 22nd July. Errol was apparently on a three month stint with Sydney CIB so we are probably talking about Ray Whitrod at Canberra in October ’49.

        July 10, 2017

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